Dear Bill Nye,

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Dear Bill Nye,

Dear Bill Nye,

I loved your show when I was a kid. You taught me that, if we look hard enough and study long enough, we can find the answers to our questions. From watching your show, I learned that there’s always something more, something deeper than what meets the eye. Science is cool. Today I watched a video by you. It was interesting, but it seems that you abandoned everything you taught me about science as you started making claims.

“Denial of evolution is unique to the United States,” you said. Really? I haven’t traveled the entire world, but in my short travels, which have gone as far southwest as Australia, southeast as Zimbabwe, to the heights of the Italian Alps, and the beaches of the Philippines, I have met people who don’t believe in evolution. Is the disbelief of evolution unique to the US? You taught me that the scientific method starts with an observation. From my observations, your statement is completely untrue.

You said, “When you have a portion of the population that doesn’t believe in that, it holds everybody back, really.” I think I hear an assumption. Are you assuming that everyone wants to go in the direction that evolution leads? CNN reported that a Gallup Poll found in June 2012, 46% of Americans believed in creationism, 32% believed in evolution guided by God, and 15% believed in atheistic evolution. Math tells me that 78% of Americans believe God had something to do with the world’s existence, so who, exactly, is being held back? Creationism is not a minority, Mr. Nye. It’s a majority.

You declared that evolution is the fundamental idea in science and biology, and that without it, it’s like trying to study geology without tectonic plates. Are you saying the evolution of one species into another, which has never been observed, is like the movement of tectonic plates, which has been observed? Somehow, making observed phenomena equal with unobserved phenomena just doesn’t sound like science.

It seems as though you imply that without evolution, the world is a place of mystery instead of an exciting place, but is it not true that there is much mystery in evolution and much excitement in creation? I dare say so. Anything we don’t understand is a mystery, and whenever we solve a mystery, it creates excitement. This is not unique to any worldview.

I do agree with one thing you said, “When you’re in love, you want to tell the world.” The only difference between us is that you believe in the passing of billions of years in favor of your love of evolution, and I believe in 6 literal days in favor of my love for God. So how about we just encourage people to explore love for themselves, rather than pushing them towards the idea you’re in love with?

The world is “fantastically complicated” whether you believe in evolution or not. It’s all a matter of which “fantastically complicated” you want to swallow–something that made itself complex over billions of years, or a God that made it complex in 6 days. It’s still a complex world.

You say that evolution explains so much of the world around us, but where’s the evidence. My only problem with evolution is that there is no evidence. There has yet to be discovered a single genuine missing link. From the Piltdown and Peking Man hoaxes to the Archaeoraptor fake, there is simply no genuine evidence of any species turning into another species. It looks like it takes a lot of faith to believe something with neither tangible nor experiential evidence.

The appeal you closed with was almost heart-warming. I just wish it had been a little more open-minded and scientific. How about we ask all parents everywhere to just let their children decide for themselves which takes more faith to believe in, creation or evolution. The belief in creation has existed far longer than evolution, and I’m going to bet that it will last a lot longer as well.

I used to know you as “Bill Nye, the Science Guy.” Sadly, now I know you as, “Bill Nye….the Guy.”

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